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The revisions for the question Crossing the Amazon, route 319

show that the URI detector breaks when it encounters a degree symbol (°) or U+00B9:

Revisions broken link

The link was copied and pasted from the browser's address field.

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  • Is this the same on other SE websites?
    – JoErNanO Mod
    Mar 6 '16 at 14:43
  • I'm not sure if RFC 3986 has been superseded or not, but by that standard, technically, URLs are still supposed to be US-ASCII. Support for any other characters is a feature of the client. This URL can be represented as https://www.google.com.pe/maps/place/3%C2%B008%2706.5%2522S%2B59%C2%B054%2708.7%2522W/%40-3.1351316%2C-59
    – choster
    Mar 6 '16 at 15:45
  • That should be https://www.google.com.pe/maps/place/3%C2%B008%2706.5%2522S%2B59%C2%B054%2708.7%2522W/%40-3.1351316%2C-59.9374329%2C14z rather.
    – choster
    Mar 6 '16 at 15:52
  • 3
    With maps.google creating that in links, and many browsers supporting it, I think we should code to the "real world." It's not a "standard" if the majority aren't following it!
    – WGroleau
    Mar 6 '16 at 21:12
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    7320 updates 3986, and suggests supporting anything allowed by HTML 4.01 (which still isn't clear on this). datatracker.ietf.org/doc/rfc7320/?include_text=1
    – WGroleau
    Mar 6 '16 at 21:27
  • @WGroleau Thanks, good to know.
    – choster
    Mar 6 '16 at 22:03
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    Posted on Meta.SE.
    – JoErNanO Mod
    Mar 9 '16 at 17:39
  • I can't quite agree with the idea that we should intentionally create a link that doesn't work with the rationale that the one which DOES work (and is human-readable) is non-standard.
    – WGroleau
    Mar 13 '16 at 4:47
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I re-posted this on Meta.SE. The question was shut down as a duplicate of an unanswered question.

The gist of the highest voted answer is:

The URL parser is correctly not including the non-encoded diamond character in the URL, because valid URLs simply cannot include them.

There might be a way of arguing for RFC 7320 updating 3986.

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