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Sometimes, people have questions about allowed topics from Travel.SE in their own country, without the intent to travel, but there isn't really a SE site where you could ask that.

I'm talking about stuff like tipping at restaurants in your home country, unwritten rules on public transport in your own country, Basically anything that's documented as a valid reason to ask a question in the help center, but where the user doesn't ask it for travel reasons.

Technically, such questions aren't allowed on here (yet), I think, because they're not exactly travel related, but they could definitely fit in here because they can help other people.

So what's the verdict on this?


This question is not a duplicate of the below question by uncovery, since that was an obvious April Fools joke that doesn't even ask the same question. This question essentially is "are questions about domestic tourism okay?", while the other question is "should we ban questions that aren't asked while traveling?".

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    @GayotFow I doubt I can provide such a screenshot, because it is a question about hypothetical questions which aren't yet on here. Or if they are, I can't find them. – Nzall Apr 13 '15 at 17:47
  • possible duplicate of Allow posts only when people are actually traveling? – uncovery May 11 '15 at 10:00
  • that was an April Fool's Joke @uncovery – Kate Gregory May 27 '15 at 15:40
  • @uncovery Great, now I have a duplicate flag on this question that isn't a duplicate at all. Does anyone know if there's a way to flag a flag? – Nzall May 27 '15 at 20:36
  • @kate-gregory, maybe you want to take a look at the author of the joke :) anyhow I think it's relevant – uncovery May 27 '15 at 21:31
  • @uncovery still, it's EXPRESSLY not a duplicate. This question is a serious question about domestic tourism. YOUR question is an April fool's joke. – Nzall May 28 '15 at 12:52
  • @NateKerkhofs SURE. YOU ARE RIGHT. – uncovery May 28 '15 at 15:14
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Personal opinion of the OP:

Personally, I don't see a difference between a question asked by the inhabitant of a country, and that same question asked by someone who has never been to that country. There might be a difference in the way the question is asked, but I doubt that the general idea of the question would be so different.

A careful reading of the rules can even be interpreted in this way already, since both examples can be interpreted as "traveling within your own country".

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I think you could simply word it as a traveller might, and that way it'll be useful to future travellers to your country/town as well.

As long as it's something travellers would want to know (tipping, transport) then yes, I agree, valid. But if it's like how the electricity company works, or the local politics, then no ;)

  • +1 It all lies in the wording. – JoErNanO Apr 14 '15 at 9:47
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Questions about domestic tourism, prompted by intent or not, are helpful.

In the UK, the 'might or might not' category, along with the 'undecided' category, are growing. It indicates that more domestic tourism decisions are being made spontaneously. Whether the question is raised by a native or not if it's on-topic a great answer puts 'more stuff' out there for consumption which drives more visitors to the site and possibly some will be inspired to contribute more great answers about niche destinations.

Exhibit: Government funded stats for last Christmas (2014)

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